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Georgie C
Texas shorebirds and mammals rendered in oil on stone by artist Georgiana Chenault of Wimberley, Texas
 

FAQ:  Frequently Asked Questions

How thick are the stones?

What do your stone paintings weigh?

How do  you display your work? 

Can the stone paintings be framed?

Is it possible to hang one of the stone paintings without using a frame?

May I use one of the stone paintings as a trivet or as a tile in a floor?

The images on the web site are small.  Would you please show a close up of a portion of a painting?
 


Answers
 

How thick are the stones?

The 12X12, 18X18 and 16X24 inch stones are approximately one-half-inch thick.  Larger pieces must be thicker (and heavier) to maintain structural integrity. 

 

What do your stone paintings weigh?

The 12" X 12" paintings on stone weigh a bit less than six pounds.  The 18" X 18" paintings on stone weigh about thirteen pounds.  Larger pieces can be considerably heavier.

 

How do  you display your work? 

Paintings on rectangular stone may be displayed either by using display easels or by hanging them on a wall.  The stones can  also be built into an interior masonry wall.  Larger, irregularly shaped stones present more of a challenge.  They could be built into a wall.  I have displayed them using heavy-duty easels.

 

 

Can the stone paintings be framed?

Absolutely.  Stones up to 16X24 inches can be framed in much the same way as a mirror.  Most higher-end frame shops will be happy to frame one of the stone paintings for you in a frame meeting your needs.  An 18X18 inch painting with frame weighs about 20 pounds, so sturdy hangers are recommended.

 

Is it possible to hang one of the stone paintings without using a frame?

Yes.  We recommend the use of so-called "Z Clips" or "Z Bars"  of the type used in hanging mirrors.  One side of the clip is securely attached to the wall using screws or bolts.  The other side of the clip may be attached to the back side of one of the stone paintings by using epoxy.  The two sides of the clip then fit together to hold the painting neatly against the wall with no frame.

 

May I use one of the stone paintings as a trivet or as a tile in a floor?

We recommend treating these works of art as you would works on canvas.  Subjecting the stone paintings to foot traffic, heat, moisture, etc., is likely to lead to rapid deterioration. 

 

The images on the web site are small.  Would you please show a close up of a portion of a painting?

Here are a couple of enlargements: